March Reading 2018


March has been a fun and varied month in the book department! Once again, my reading this month was mostly goodies from the library. There was also a few books added to my Kindle app... as well as a book gift that came in the mail for me. As usual, I'm sharing a mix of genres, and reading in English and Norwegian.  

Dagbøker fra Jerusalem: 20 år som brobygger mellom religion og politikk by Trond Bakkevig. I could translate this as Journal from Jerusalem: 20 years bridging the gap between religion and politics. Bakkevik, a pastor in the Norwegian State Church (Lutheran) reflects on his many years and experiences as part of the peacemaking in the Middle East. VERY poignant!

Grønne måltider by Therese Elgquist ...this has a reference to an English title as The New Green Salad, but is actually a Swedish book. :/ BEAUTIFULLY photographed book and delicious recipes for creating nourishing salads full of vegetables, grains, seeds and exciting dressings. Move over, plain green mixed salad!

Midtlivsdietten... I read this in Norwegian, but in English this is The Midlife Kitchen: health-boosting recipes for midlife and beyond  by Mimi Spencer and Sam Rice. VERY inspirational source for developing new eating and life habits in midlife!

Reproduserte brikkebånd fra Vestfold by Else-Margrethe Huse. A book about the historic decorative bands produced as belts and decoration for clothing in the region where we live--Vestfold--and how to reproduce them today. Sorry, no link to this in English. The bands and belts are made in tablet/card weaving. Tablet weaving is an art I'm just beginning to learn about, mostly by reading, though I have a few supplies once I get down to learning some of it! More on this soon...

Festbånd: brikkevev med ny vri by Sigrid Brox Haugen... another book with more modern designs in tablet/card weaving. Again, sorry, no link in English. :/

Marius strikkebok: 45 Marius-strikkeoppskrifter, klassikere, historier og nye oppskrifter One of the most famous designs in the Norwegian cultural archive--and indeed, Scandinavian design--is the Marius sweater designed by Unn Søiland in 1953. Unn Søiland was a bit of a pioneer in her day, creating knitwear using bright colors and elegant patterns that were considered unusual at the time, but very soon became the standard for popular hand-knitting. The pattern, and its variations, have been loved for decades now, and new ways to use the pattern are always evolving. The design is even printed on to things like T-shirts, bed linen, rain coats, fine scarves, and all sorts. You can purchase ready-made Marius sweaters through the official Marius site. Here's a glance at the beautiful Marius sweater. Now that I'm dipping into colorwork knitting, I hope one day to knit something in the Marius pattern!!

The Poems of Robert Frost A lovely old Modern Library edition given to me as a gift by a friend! Robert Frost is such a great companion! I like having this one on my nightstand table. 

A little bit of fiction... I read Borrowed Light, and its sequel, Enduring Light by Carla Kelly 1909-10 Wyoming, USA... a young Mormon woman travels to Wyoming to be a chef on a remote ranch, cooking for a bunch of cowboys. She unexpectedly finds love, grace in perseverance through challenges, and deeper faith! Just loved these! These would make a great Hallmark film!

The Year-Round Vegetable Garden: How to Grow Your Own Food 365 Days a Year, No Matter Where You Live by Niki Jabbour. The title says it all! How to select seed/plant varieties for each season, tips on succession planting, and how to build structures to support and protect crops from the elements. Jabbour lives in Nova Scotia, Canada where they have WINTER, and so I learned a lot from this book. I'm eager to try to learn how to make our patch here productive in all seasons! 

During Lent my daily reading has been from The Magnificat Lenten Companion and Together on Retreat: Meeting Jesus in Prayer by James Martin, SJ ... both very great companion reading during the Lenten journey...

What about you? What book(s) is/are on your nightstand, or coffee table, in your bag, or on your tablet/device... or even on your wish list?! Any recommendations?!


Comments

  1. What a lovely list of all the kind of books I love to immerse myself in!!! Really enjoyed the link to the Marius sweater information. Sounds like you'll be getting your knitting needles out sometime soon!!! Fascinating about the tablet weaving as well. I've tried various kinds of weaving (in hopes that it would help diminish the stash!!!!) but I've not given it enough time or energy to become good at it. Hope you have better success than I've had.

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    1. Thanks, Steph! Oh, but I wish the Marius book was translated into English for the rest of the world to read, but it doesn't seem to be. There's a lot of great knitwear and knitwear history that woul be great or others to know... but not enough is, or has been, translated. Anyway, I do hope to knit a Marius pattern something or other... of course, the ultimate is a Marius sweater! I has similar thoughts about weaving too, that it might be a good way to use yarn leftovers. I'm doing some reading on the tablet weaving and have a set of tablets for weaving, but have yet to start. This year seems to be becoming about learning new fiber techniques! :)

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  2. Every time I see your reading and a lot of it is in Norwegian, I bow my head in honor to your! Bravo for reading in your adopted country's language as well as your native tongue. Many interesting books here, Tracy!

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    1. Thanks, Jeanie, that's so nice! It's a challenge--learning, reading and speaking another language. The speaking part can still be very tricky--getting the whole fluency thing will always be a lifelong project. But I love do love to read in Norwegian. And it's always fun to see what we can find at the library! :)

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  3. I always love catching up with what you are reading, and I am amazed that you have the capacity to read in Norwegian. We watch a few Scandanavian television shows and the language always looks so difficult to me. (Thank goodness for subtitles!) I am so pleased you enjoyed Carla Kelly's books! I think they would make great films also. I think you would enjoy her book My Loving Vigil Keeping, which is based on a true story. I can read her books again and again! Love you! Hope you and TJ are having a wonderful weekend! xoxo

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    1. Hi, Marie! Thanks for the extra Carla Kelly readint tips! She has written a lot of books, different genres too. I looking forward to discovering more. Norwegian is a difficult language. I struggle with it a lot, actually. So much about it doesn't seem logical at all to me... But I can only try! Reading is easier, as I don't have to open my mouth and all the wrong words fall out. ;) haha...

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  4. I applaud you for reading in Norwegian. I read your answer to Jeanie's comment and I know exactly what you mean. Even though English as a second language is probably way easier to learn (and master) than Norwegian, it's still a second language for me and I sometimes struggle to find the right words that really express what I want to say. It's often the nuances in a language that are so important - and so difficult to master as a foreign language.

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    1. Hi, Carola! Great to see you here again! It's so nice to have met you through Jeanie...she's a sweetheart, isn't she?! Like you with English, when switching from my Native English to Norwegian, I so often feel like I don't have all the words. A lot of the time I feel like I'm not expressing myself very well, or as well as I do in English, and that can be frustrating. Norwegian doesn't have as varied and many words for expression as English, and I find that part of the challenge. I feel like I'm using the same expression over and over again for multiple things, and it feels a bit limited. But having said that, the challenge to continue learning is always there. And as I live here, it is better for me to keep up the challenge. ;)

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  5. Love Robert Frost and your fiction books sound wonderful too. The Norwegian knitting is always so beautiful. Have you can across Britt-Arnihild's knitting blog? She is from Trondheim and has done some videos recently.

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    1. Britt-Arnhild! Yes, I came across her in my earlier days of blogging,
      --over 10 years ago now!--but we lost track of each other. Glad she is still blogging. I did know she wrote more than one blog (how does she do that, or have the time?!), but didn't know she had a blog about knitting... I must look her up again! Thanks for letting me know, Marilyn! :)

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  6. Oh my dear friend, I love how you love to read. I too enjoy reading. It is something that I yearn to do more of. You are student of learning in various areas and I admire that.
    I too love Robert Frost poems but haven't read any for a while. You have inspired me to do this again.
    I have heard of the Borrowed Light books and am very interested in reading them. I must put these on my book list. We have book clubs here and I want to get more involved in reading different kinds of books. One of them just read a book by C.S. Lewis. I love his writings and thoughts which are based in Christian thought.
    I am especially interested in the Year around Vegetable Garden. Since it is for all areas of the world; I am very excited to look into it.
    Your last one, "Together In Repeat: Meeting Jesus In Prayer". Getting a closer relationship with my Savior is one of my greatest desires.
    Thanks for this one and I am sending loving thoughts and big hugs your way. You are awesome!!

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